Pierre Guyotat; by John Taylor

  «A new book by Pierre Guyotat (b. 1940) is always an “event,” little matter whether one reads it. When Progénitures appeared in France, to the sort of consternated fanfare that has frequently greeted this writer’s output, one well-placed critic declared that neither he nor anyone else could, or would, read all eight hundred, bizarrely spelled, meticulously versified pages of this “novel” that is probably more akin to an extended Old Testament chronicle. This accusation of “unreadablenes,” attached to Guyotat’s strange and provocative work ever since (at least) the lexical and orthographic experiments of Prostitution (1975), is nonetheless qualified by…

Lorenzo Chiesa; Lacan with Artaud

    The multiple theoretical overlappings between Artaud and Lacan are marked by the silent eloquence of a bio-graphical half-saying. It is possible to locate only a single place in the entire corpus of Lacan’s writings, seminars and conferences in which he speaks directly of Artaud: in “Raison d’un échec”, Lacan threatens to “sedate” those of his followers who would be inclined to behave like him. Indeed, their sole actual encounter had been a clinical one: Doctor Lacan visited the inmate Artaud in 1938, shortly after his hospitalisation in Saint Anne. On that occasion he declared: “Artaud is obsessed, he…

Jean-Marie Gleize; An invitation to disorder: poetry, insurrection, and concrete utopia.

  On November 11, 2008, the French government stormed what they called an “anarcho-autonomist cell,” a group who had set up a store in the small village of Tarnac in central France. Accused of “criminal conspiracy to commit a terrorist act,” the members of this group were suspected of having sabotaged the catenaries of a high-speed train. Although most of those arrested were released fairly rapidly, Julien Coupat, the presumed leader of the cell, spent more than six months in jail without trial, under “preventative arrest.” What is particularly striking about this situation, and generally in line with the effects…

Jean-Marie Gleize; Le Livre des cabanes

  4. TROUVER ICI Lecommunismen’est         niunfantasme          niuneprojection utopique           c’est la possibilité    d’amplifier    l’expérience  d’une  joie   la possibilité d’intensifier la joie   il s’agit avant tout de la couleur des choses  de la couleur de l’air                                                    elle disait : L’air est rouge   la joie, la vie, cela, nu, intensifié, nu, vertical, physique, musical.   «Vers le bout du chemin…

Katerina Gogou / AUTOPSY REPORT

  AUTOPSY REPORT 2.11.75 …the body was lying face down, in parallel it was united with the Vatican. One hand bloodied, stretched, middle finger up at the PCI and the other brandishing his genitales to the art specialists. The blood on his hair leeches on the veiled homosexuality syndromes of men all around the earth. His face disfigured by the frames of the class he denied bruised volunteer of the ragged proletariat. The fingers of his left hand broken by socialist realism thrown at floodlit garbage. The jaw broken by the uppercut of a worker syndicalist and paid thug. The…

Georges Didi-Huberman; To Render Sensible

  Representable People, Imaginary People? Representation of the people comes up against a double difficulty, if not a double aporia, that comes from the impossibility of our subsuming each of the two terms, “representation” and “people,” into the unity of one concept. Hannah Arendt said that we will never manage to think about the political dimension as long as we stubbornly persist in speaking of man, since politics is interested precisely in something else, which is men, whose multiplicity is modulated differently each time, whether it be in conflict or community. (1) Likewise we must say, and forcefully, that we…

Deleuze/Guattari; How Do You Make Yourself a Body Without Organs?

At any rate, you have one (or several). It’s not so much that it preexists or comes ready-made, although in certain respects it is preexistent. At any Tate, you make one, you can’t desire without making one. And it awaits you; it is an inevitable exercise or experimentation, already accomplished the moment you undertake it, unaccomplished as long as you don’t. This is not assuring, because you can botch it. Or it can be terrifying, and lead you to your death. It is nondesire as well as desire. It is not at all a notion or a concept but a…